SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Karlsson ME, Zielinski MJ. Trauma Violence Abuse 2018; ePub(ePub): 1524838018767933.

Affiliation

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, SAGE Publishing)

DOI

10.1177/1524838018767933

PMID

29661117

Abstract

Incarcerated women evidence high rates of both interpersonal trauma and mental illness. In particular, the rates of sexual violence victimization are so high that some researchers have suggested that sexual abuse may be a pathway to prison for women, likely through the development of mental illness, including substance abuse. This review article summarizes the literature on sexual victimization ( n = 32 articles; 28 independent studies) and mental illness ( n = 11 articles; 8 independent studies) prevalence among samples of incarcerated women ( Ns ≥ 100) in context of methodological choices within included articles. Best estimates for sexual victimization from studies using validated survey methods were as follows: 50-66% for child sexual abuse, 28-68% for adult sexual abuse, and 56-82% for lifetime sexual assault. Although data directly comparing prevalence of sexual victimization among incarcerated women to prevalence for other groups are limited, the existing data indicate that incarcerated women have significantly greater exposure thanincarcerated men and community samples of women. Moreover, compared to findings from the National Comorbidity Survey-Replication, incarcerated women evidence greater prevalence of most lifetime and current mental illnesses, especially depressive disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and substance use disorders. Surprisingly, only two independent studies have investigated the overlap between sexual victimization and mental illness in samples of incarcerated women. Both studies found disproportionally high rates of mental illness among victims of sexual violence. Suggestions and implications for research, policy, and practice are discussed.


Language: en

Keywords

alcohol and drugs; child abuse; mental health and violence; revictimization; sexual assault

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print