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Journal Article

Citation

Wang R, Xue D, Liu Y, Liu P, Chen H. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018; 15(6): e15061160.

Affiliation

School of Architecture, Southeast University, Si-Pai-Lou Road No. 2, Nanjing 210096, China. hongsheng.chen2006@163.com.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph15061160

PMID

29865258

Abstract

There is increasing evidence from the developed world that air pollution is significantly related to residents' depressive symptoms; however, the existence of such a relationship in developing countries such as China is still unclear. Furthermore, although neighbourhood social capital is beneficial for health, whether it is a protective factor in the relationship between health and environment pollution remains unclear. Consequently, we examined the effects of cities' PM2.5 concentrations on residents' depressive symptoms and the moderating effects of neighbourhood social capital, using data from the 2016 wave of China Labourforce Dynamics Survey and the real-time remote inquiry website of Airborne Fine Particulate Matter and Air Quality Index.

RESULTS showed that PM2.5 concentrations and neighbourhood social capital may increase and decrease respondents' depressive symptoms, respectively. Notably, neighbourhood social capital decreased the negative effect of PM2.5 concentrations on respondents' depressive symptoms. These analyses contributed to the understanding of the effect of air pollution on mental health in China and confirmed that neighbourhood social capital were protective factors in the relationship between health and environment hazards.


Language: en

Keywords

China; PM2.5 concentrations; depressive symptoms; moderate effect; neighbourhood social capital

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