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Journal Article

Citation

Bevens CL, Brown AL, Loughnan S. PLoS One 2018; 13(6): e0199808.

Affiliation

Department of Psychology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, Public Library of Science)

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0199808

PMID

29953511

Abstract

Sexual aggression is prevalent and damaging in our culture, and sources of support or blame following an attack of this kind can be important influences on the recovery process. This pair of studies investigate the nature of women's blame reactions towards survivors of sexual aggression, as well as the potential for provision of sympathy and support. Specifically, we focused on the previously neglected role of female self-objectification. It was expected that increased self-objectification would lead to decreased sympathy and support, and more rape victim blame. However, results of Study 1 showed that chronic self-objectification was actually related to higher levels of sympathy and support for a rape victim. Study two built upon the limitations of study one, and examined similar questions. It was expected that women who engaged in greater self-objectification would again show greater sympathy and support for the victim, replicating study one's results, and this was supported with a different scale. The overall relationship between self-objectification and sympathy and support was driven by body-relevant control beliefs. Implications and future directions are discussed.


Language: en

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