SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Grigoriadis G, Carpanen D, Webster CE, Ramasamy A, Newell N, Masouros SD. Ann. Biomed. Eng. 2019; 47(1): 306-316.

Affiliation

Department of Bioengineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. s.masouros@imperial.ac.uk.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1007/s10439-018-02138-4

PMID

30276492

Abstract

Over 80% of wounded Service Members sustain at least one extremity injury. The 'deck-slap' foot, a product of the vehicle's floor rising rapidly when attacked by a mine to injure the limb, has been a signature injury in recent conflicts. Given the frequency and severity of these combat-related extremity injuries, they require the greatest utilisation of resources for treatment, and have caused the greatest number of disabled soldiers during recent conflicts. Most research efforts focus on occupants seated with both tibia-to-femur and tibia-to-foot angles set at 90°; it is unknown whether results obtained from these tests are applicable when alternative seated postures are adopted. To investigate this, lower limbs from anthropometric testing devices (ATDs) and post mortem human subjects (PMHSs) were loaded in three different seated postures using an under-body blast injury simulator. Using metrics that are commonly used for assessing injury, such as the axial force and the revised tibia index, the lower limb of ATDs were found to be insensitive to posture variations while the injuries sustained by the PMHS lower limbs differed in type and severity between postures. This suggests that the mechanism of injury depends on the posture and that this cannot be captured by the current injury criteria. Therefore, great care should be taken when interpreting and extrapolating results, especially in vehicle qualification tests, when postures other than the 90°-90° are of interest.


Language: en

Keywords

Anthropometric testing devices; Blast injury; Foot and ankle; Lower limb biomechanics; Lower limb posture; Post mortem human surrogates; Trauma biomechanics; Underbody blast

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print