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Journal Article

Citation

van Hoof J, Bennetts H, Hansen A, Kazak JK, Soebarto V. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019; 16(6): ePub.

Affiliation

School of Architecture and Built Environment, The University of Adelaide, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. veronica.soebarto@adelaide.edu.au.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph16060935

PMID

30875903

Abstract

Ageing brings about physiological changes that affect people's thermal sensitivity and thermoregulation. The majority of older Australians prefer to age in place and modifications to the home environment are often required to accommodate the occupants as they age and possibly become frail. However, modifications to aid thermal comfort are not always considered. Using a qualitative approach this study aims to understand the thermal qualities of the existing living environment of older South Australians, their strategies for keeping cool in hot weather and warm in cold weather and to identify existing problems related to planning and house design, and the use of heating and cooling. Data were gathered via seven focus group sessions with 49 older people living in three climate zones in South Australia. The sessions yielded four main themes, namely 'personal factors', 'feeling', 'knowing' and 'doing'. These themes can be used as a basis to develop information and guidelines for older people in dealing with hot and cold weather.


Language: en

Keywords

building services engineering; elderly; housing; older adults; public health; seniors; temperature; thermal comfort; thermal sensation

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