SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Kim HK, Lim Si En R, Wong Kang Min D. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019; 16(11): e16111897.

Affiliation

Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, Nanyang Technological University, 31 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637718, Singapore. DORO0008@e.ntu.edu.sg.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph16111897

PMID

31146355

Abstract

Asians are more susceptible to alcohol flush syndrome and its associated health risks because they are genetically predisposed towards it. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, this research examined the psychosocial factors associated with moderate alcohol consumption, in order to inform the development of a health campaign targeting young Asian "flushers" in Singapore. We employed a mixed-method design comprising an online survey and focus group discussions. The survey results identified perceived behavioural control as the most salient belief associated with moderate drinking intentions, particularly for Asian flushers. Although Asian flushers had more positive attitudes towards, and perceived behavioural control about drinking in moderation, they were more likely to consider that their peers disapprove of such a practice, compared to non-flushers. Additionally, Asian flushers did not consider themselves as having a higher risk of long-term health effects from alcohol consumption than non-Flushers despite their actual high-risk status. Focus group findings suggest that young Asian flushers have poor knowledge of, and skills associated with moderate drinking, in addition to feeling self-imposed social pressure. The study findings provide practical insights into bridging the information gap on Asian flush and promoting Asian flushers' drinking in moderation.


Language: en

Keywords

Asian flush; alcohol; evidence-based health promotion; theory of planned behaviour

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print