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Journal Article

Citation

Granvik Saminathen M, Låftman SB, Modin B. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019; 16(11): e16111912.

Affiliation

Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS), Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden. bitte.modin@su.se.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, MDPI: Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute)

DOI

10.3390/ijerph16111912

PMID

31151165

Abstract

School choice allows students from more disadvantaged district areas in metropolitan Swedish cities to commute to more prestigious schools outside of their residential area. This study examined how such students fare compared to their peers who attend more deprived schools in their own district area. Multilevel analysis was applied, estimating 2-level random intercept linear regression models based on cross-sectional survey data collected among ninth grade students in 2014 and 2016 (n = 2105). Analyses showed that students living in relatively disadvantaged district areas of Stockholm who chose to attend more prestigious schools outside of their residential area performed better academically compared to students who opted to remain at more deprived schools in their catchment area, an association that was partly mediated by school quality in terms of teacher-rated school ethos. Yet, commuting students reported lower school satisfaction and more psychological complaints than students who stayed behind, even when taking academic achievement and school ethos into account. The association with psychological complaints was partly mediated by school satisfaction. Thus, the academic gain associated with having chosen to commute from a disadvantaged area to a more prestigious school does not appear to translate into higher school satisfaction and better psychological well-being.


Language: en

Keywords

adolescents; inequality; school choice; school ethos; segregation; well-being

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