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Journal Article

Citation

Lovallo WR, Acheson A, Cohoon AJ, Sorocco KH, Vincent AS, Hodgkinson CA, Goldman D. PLoS One 2019; 14(6): e0218212.

Affiliation

Laboratory of Neurogenetics, NIH, NIAAA, Bethesda, MD, United States of America.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Public Library of Science)

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0218212

PMID

31185043

Abstract

Early life adversity (ELA) negatively affects health behaviors in adulthood, but pathways from ELA exposure to behavioral outcomes are poorly understood. ELA in childhood and adolescence may translate into adult outcomes by way of modified glucocorticoid signaling. The cortisol cotransporter, FKBP5 has a G-to-A substitution (rs9296158) that hinders cortisol trafficking within target cells, and this impaired glucocorticoid signaling may shape the long-term response to ELA. We used performance on the Stroop test to assess working memory in 546 healthy young adults who had experienced 0, 1, or > 1 forms of ELA in childhood and adolescence and were genotyped for the FKBP5 rs9296158 G-to-A polymorphism. We observed a robust Gene x Environment interaction (F = 9.49, p <.0001) in which increased ELA exposure led to progressively greater Stroop interference in persons carrying AG and AA genotypes of FKBP5 with no such effect in GG carriers. Further work is needed to explore the modification of cognitive function resulting from ELA. Impairments in working memory illustrate how ELA may use glucocorticoid pathways to influence working memory with potential implications for decision-making and risky behavior including substance use disorders.


Language: en

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