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Journal Article

Citation

Doering JJ, Salm Ward TC. Am. J. Public Health 2017; 107(6): 945-949.

Affiliation

Jennifer J. Doering is with the College of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Trina C. Salm Ward is with the College of Public Health and School of Social Work, University of Georgia, Athens.

Comment In:

Am J Public Health 2017;107(6):838-839.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2017, American Public Health Association)

DOI

10.2105/AJPH.2017.303709

PMID

28426294

PMCID

PMC5425853

Abstract

Infants can suffocate on air mattresses, even when the mattress is fully inflated. The interfacing issues of poverty, the bedbug epidemic, and changes in the design and marketing of air mattresses may be increasing consumer use of air mattresses as primary sleep environments and thus increasing the potential for infant death. Despite recent changes to improve air mattress safety labeling, the National Child Death Review Case Reporting System found that between 2004 and 2015 across 24 states, an air mattress was the incident sleep place for 108 infants whose deaths were either during sleep or in a sleep environment. At the same time, design components such as inflatable headboards and memory foam pillow tops potentially increase the hazard to infants, and marketing changes represent air mattresses as a preferred low-cost primary sleep environment. Analysis of current data surveillance systems, published position statements, and consumer materials from national organizations and federal agencies reveal opportunities for changing policy to better protect infants from this hazard.


Language: en

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