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Journal Article

Citation

Shen K, Zhang B, Feng Q. BMC Geriatr. 2019; 19(1): e246.

Affiliation

Department of Sociology & Centre for Family and Population Research (CFPR), National University of Singapore, AS1 #04-30, 11 Arts Link, Singapore, 117570, Singapore. socfq@nus.edu.sg.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group - BMC)

DOI

10.1186/s12877-019-1259-z

PMID

31484503

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite accumulating evidence on the protective effect of tea consumption against depression, studies specifically focusing on the elderly population are yet limited. This paper examined the association between the frequency and duration of tea drinking and depressive symptoms of older adults by gender and age groups, based on a nationally representative sample in China.

METHOD: The study employed the panel data from 2005, 2008/2009, 2011/2012 and 2014 waves of Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS). We used the frequency and consistency of tea drinking behaviors to identify four types of tea consumption amongst Chinese seniors. Depressive symptoms were assessed by a five-item scale. Linear mixed effects models were applied.

RESULTS: We found that consistent and frequent tea-drinking was associated with significantly less depressive symptoms, and such impact was partially mediated by socioeconomic status, health behavior, physical health, cognitive function, and social engagement. However, the association was only significant for males and the oldest-old, rather than females and younger elders.

CONCLUSIONS: Consistent and frequent tea-drinking may effectively reduce the risk of depressive symptoms for the Chinese elderly. The promotion of the traditional lifestyle of tea drinking could be a cost-effective way towards healthy aging for China.


Language: en

Keywords

Chinese; Depressive symptom; Elderly; Tea

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