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Journal Article

Citation

van Meijel EPM, Gigengack MR, Verlinden E, van der Steeg AFW, Goslings JC, Bloemers FW, Luitse JSK, Boer F, Grootenhuis MA, Lindauer RJL. Child Psychiatry Hum. Dev. 2019; ePub(ePub): ePub.

Affiliation

de Bascule, Academic Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1007/s10578-019-00924-2

PMID

31494749

Abstract

Studies on the long-term prevalence of parental posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) following child accidental injury are scarce, and findings on risk factors vary. In this follow-up study (T2, n = 69) we determined the prevalence of parental PTSS 2-4 years after accidental injury of their child, compared with 3 months after the accident (T1, n = 135). Additionally, we examined the association between parental and child factors and PTSS severity. Children were 8-18 years old at the time of the accident. Parent and child PTSS was assessed by self-report. Other data were retrieved from medical records and a telephone interview. Parental PTSS was 9.6% at T1 and 5.8% at T2. Acute parental stress as measured within 2 weeks of the child's accident was significantly associated with parental PTSS severity (T1 and T2), as was the child's hospitalization of more than 1 day at T1 and the child's permanent physical impairment at T2. To prevent adverse long-term psychological consequences we recommend identifying and monitoring parents at risk and offering them timely treatment.


Language: en

Keywords

Accident; Children and adolescents; Injury; Parent; Posttraumatic stress

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