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Journal Article

Citation

Marchiondo LA, Cortina LM, Kabat‐Farr D. Appl. Psychol. 2018; 67(3): 369-400.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, International Association of Applied Psychology, Publisher John Wiley and Sons)

DOI

10.1111/apps.12127

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Ample research demonstrates that workplace incivility has individual and organisational costs, but an important question remains unanswered: might it have benefits as well? We investigate this possibility by focusing on incivility appraisals--both negative and challenge appraisals (i.e. as an opportunity for learning, growth)--and their correlates. To explain this diversity of appraisals, we examine whether attributions (i.e. perceived intent to harm, perceived perpetrator control) predict perceptions. We conducted two multi-method (quantitative and qualitative) surveys, one of which was multi-source, of employees across a range of occupations. In Study 1, attributions that perpetrators acted with control and malicious intent fuelled negative appraisals of incivility, which undermined job satisfaction. Study 2 added to these findings by demonstrating that some targets formed challenge appraisals of uncivil encounters, especially when they attributed low malicious intent to perpetrators; challenge appraisal related to boosts in job satisfaction and thriving. These attitudinal outcomes then positively related to organisational citizenship behaviour, as reported by targets' coworkers. Showing paths to incivility harm (and potential benefit), our findings can inform interventions to alter the impact of workplace incivility.


Language: en

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