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Journal Article

Citation

Leerkes A, Martinez R, Groeneveld P. Br. J. Criminol. 2019; 59(1): 166-187.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, Publisher Oxford University Press)

DOI

10.1093/bjc/azy021

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Immigrants and their native-born children tend to be overrepresented among crime suspects in Europe. Using a representative Dutch survey, we examine whether inhabitants of Turkish and Moroccan origin also self-report more crimes than the native Dutch. In addition, we test various explanations for ethnic differences in crime, partly using variables that are unavailable in administrative data (socio-economic status [SES], perceived discrimination, neighbourhood disadvantage and control, family bonds, religiousness). We discover two 'minority paradoxes'. Firstly, contrary to analyses using administrative data, both minorities have similar to lower self-reported crime rates compared to the majority group when age, sex, urbanization, SES and social desirability are controlled. Secondly, first-generation immigrants report fewer crimes than expected given their social disadvantage, thus indicating a notable 'righteous migrant effect'.


Language: en

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