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Journal Article

Citation

Sharps MJ, Herrera MR, Hulett DL, Briley A. J. Police Crim. Psychol. 2018; 33(4): 327-331.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, Holtzbrinck Springer Nature Publishing Group)

DOI

10.1007/s11896-018-9283-z

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Cognitive approaches to training for the detection of improvised explosive devices (IED's) are of increasing importance. However, there is a question as to the degree to which such training might interfere with other important law enforcement (LE) functions in the field, and the degree to which such training might enhance other important cognitive/perceptual functions. A promising cognitive approach to IED training, the SMOKE system, was provided to respondents, who then responded to shoot/no-shoot decisions, important LE situations of increasing relevance. It was shown that SMOKE training did not interfere with shoot/no-shoot decisions. However, those with SMOKE training performed better than control respondents on eyewitness memory for the perpetrator of a given crime in field-valid scenes. This indicates that cognitively based training may enhance vigilance and resultant memory in field situations.


Language: en

Keywords

Bomb detection training; Cognitive training; Eyewitness memory; Improvised explosive devices (IEDs); Officer-involved shootings; Shoot/no-shoot decisions

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