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Journal Article

Citation

Lim WY, Fong CW, Chan JM, Heng D, Bhalla V, Chew SK. Alcohol Alcohol. 2007; 42(4): 354-361.

Affiliation

Epidemiology and Disease Control Division, Ministry of Health Singapore, 16 College Road, College of Medicine Building, Singapore 169854, Singapore.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2007, Oxford University Press)

DOI

10.1093/alcalc/agm017

PMID

17496306

Abstract

Aims: To present trends in alcohol consumption between 1992 and 2004 in Singapore. Methods: Alcohol consumption data were derived from national health surveys conducted in 1992, 1998 and 2004. Age-adjusted prevalence of frequent (drinking 1-4 days a week), regular (drinking more than 4 days a week) and binge (having five or more drinks during a drinking session at least once in the month) drinking by gender and age group for the three surveys were compared. Multivariate analyses for binge drinking in 2004 were performed using logistic regression models. Results: Prevalence of frequent, regular and binge drinking increased between 1992 and 2004. Prevalence increase in binge drinking was highest (from 5.1 to 10.0%), followed by frequent drinking (from 4.5 to 7.5%) and regular drinking (from 2.9 to 3.1%). Uptake in binge drinking increased in both genders and across all age groups but was most evident among adults aged 18-29. Frequent drinking increase was observed for both genders but was most pronounced among women aged 18-29. The level of regular drinking declined in men but increased in women, especially those aged 18-29 and 30-49. Being younger, male, separated, divorced or widowed, a current smoker, or having a monthly household income of S$6000 and above were attributes positively associated with binge drinking. Conclusions: Alcohol consumption, especially binge drinking, has increased among Singaporeans between 1992 and 2004. There is gender convergence in alcohol consumption.


Language: en

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