SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Asselstine J, Kristman VL, Armstrong JJ, Dewan N. Brain Inj. 2019; ePub(ePub): ePub.

Affiliation

EPID@Work Research Institute, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Informa - Taylor and Francis Group)

DOI

10.1080/02699052.2019.1682670

PMID

31661628

Abstract

Background/Objectives: Post-concussion syndrome refers to the adverse group of symptoms following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The Rivermead post-concussion syndrome questionnaire (RPQ) is a common clinical tool for assessing baseline post-concussion syndrome symptomology; however, it is unknown if scores on this questionnaire are associated with future disability. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine the association between baseline RPQ scores and future disability in older adults with mTBI.Methods and Findings: This study used a prospective cohort design, using the RPQ to measure baseline post-concussion syndrome symptomatology. Disability at 6 months was measured using the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE; disability), short-form 12 (SF-12; physical and mental quality of life), and self-reported recovery. Linear and logistic models adjusted for confounding factors were estimated using 200 bootstrapped samples. Individuals with higher levels of baseline symptomatology were more likely to have poor GOSE scores (RR = 2.13, 95% CI [1.51, 2.31]) and self-reported recovery (RR = 2.64, 95% CI [1.31, 8.98]) 6 months later.Conclusions: High levels of baseline symptomatology may be associated with overall disability and individual perceptions of recovery 6 months post-MTBI. While the RPQ is valid in assessing a patient's post-concussive symptoms following mTBI, it may not predict long-term physical or mental health in older adults.


Language: en

Keywords

mTBI; mild traumatic brain injury; older adults; prognosis; recovery

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print