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Journal Article

Citation

Do R, Lu LQ, Strauss MB. Undersea Hyperb. Med. 2019; 46(5): 719-722.

Affiliation

Long Beach Memorial Medical Center.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

31683373

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Stingray spine injuries are among the most common marine animal injuries in humans. While most resolve with immersion in warm water, a few become infected and require antibiotics. We present a case report of a presumptive stingray injury that evolved to a major slough and which required prolonged healing in a patient with diabetes mellitus. Our literature review was unable to find a similarly reported case. MATERIALS: A co-author was asked to evaluate and manage an ominous-appearing wound on the right foot of a diabetic. The problem developed after the individual had been wading in shallow ocean beach water. The patient's diabetic sensory neuropathy obscured the immediate association of the problem with a stingray injury, but this became the presumptive diagnosis when pain developed and necessitated that he seek medical care.

FINDINGS/CLINICAL COURSE: After an initial urgent care visit, increasing pain and worsening appearance of the patient's foot necessitated a visit to our emergency department. The patient was admitted the next day due to symptoms of systemic sepsis. On the fourth hospital day, a large bulla on the lateral side of the right foot was excised. This unroofed a full-thickness slough to the periosteum level of the underlying bones. Not until the 16th hospital day had enough improvement occurred to discharge the patient. Over the next 16 weeks, the wound improved, developed a vascular base and epithelialized.

CONCLUSION: With a dearth of literature about stingray injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus reported, our case is unique: The patient's wound course more closely resembled a toxic inoculation than the typical puncture wound-cellulitis presentations associated with stingray injuries.

Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.


Language: en

Keywords

clinical toxicology ; diabetes ; diving incidents ; incidents ; marine animals ; stingray ; toxins ; wounds

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