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Journal Article

Citation

McGee TK, Nation MO, Christianson AC. Int. J. Disaster Risk Reduct. 2019; 33: 266-274.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2019, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.ijdrr.2018.10.012

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Wildfire evacuations are used to protect lives during wildfires. Existing research has identified that some people stay behind during a mandatory wildfire evacuation and factors that influence evacuation actions, however little is known about how Indigenous peoples respond in the event of a wildfire. This paper presents results of a qualitative study with Mishkeegogamang Ojibway Nation in North-Western Ontario, Canada, that was evacuated due to the SLK 35 wildfire in 2011. Semi-structured interviews were completed to learn how people in Mishkeegogamang responded when they were told to evacuate and factors influencing their actions. Although some participants were willing to leave, some did not want to leave and some stayed behind due to low risk perceptions, and desires to protect dwelling contents, stay home, retain control, and fight the fire. Recommendations are provided for wildfire and emergency managers.
Summary
This study examines wildfire evacuation responses in a First Nation in northern Ontario, Canada that was evacuated due to wildfire in 2011. During the staged evacuation process, some participants left willingly, while others did not. Factors that influenced how people responded during the mandatory evacuation are discussed.


Language: en

Keywords

Canada; Emergency management; First Nations; Hazard; Indigenous peoples; Response; Wildfire evacuation

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