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Journal Article

Citation

Kia K, Fitch SM, Newsom SA, Kim JH. Appl. Ergon. 2020; 85: e103065.

Affiliation

School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA. Electronic address: jay.kim@oregonstate.edu.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2020, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2020.103065

PMID

32174353

Abstract

The aim of this study was to employ validated biological markers to quantify the physiologic consequences of exposure to whole-body vibration (WBV) and evaluate the relative impact of mining vehicle operator vibration exposure on physiological responses as compared to vertical-axial dominant WBV. In a laboratory-based study with a repeated-measures design, we played actual field-measured floor vibration profiles into a 6-degree-of-freedom motion platform to create different realistic WBV exposures: 1) vertical-dominant vibration collected from long-haul trucks, 2) multi-axial vibration collected from mining heavy equipment vehicles, and 3) no vibration (control condition). Circulating biomarkers of interest were cortisol and catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine) to assess physiological stress, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) to test for inflammation, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) to measure oxidative stress, and myoglobin and plasma creatine kinase to assess muscle damage. We collected blood samples at pre-exposure (0 h), during-exposure (2 and 4 h), and 2 h into recovery after the WBV exposure (6 h) in all four exposure conditions. The results showed that a single, 4-h acute exposure to WBV may not be sufficient to induce skeletal muscle damage, inflammation or physiologic stress measurable in the blood. No significant differences were observed between conditions for any of the biomarkers that could be attributed to the exposure contrast between vertical-dominant and multi-axial WBV exposures. These findings further indicate known complications of WBV exposure likely arise secondary to chronic, repeated exposures that give rise to subclinical stresses that were not captured here.

Copyright © 2020. Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Language: en

Keywords

Biomarkers; Muscle damage; Musculoskeletal disorders; Off-road vehicles; Oxidative stress; Professional drivers

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