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Journal Article

Citation

O'Connor DB, Gartland N, O'Connor RC. Int. Rev. Neurobiol. 2020; 152: 101-130.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2020, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/bs.irn.2019.11.006

PMID

unavailable

Abstract

Suicide is a global health issue accounting for at least 800,000 deaths per annum. Numerous models have been proposed that differ in their emphasis on the role of psychological, social, psychiatric and neurobiological factors in explaining suicide risk. Central to many models is a stress-diathesis component which states that suicidal behavior is the result of an interaction between acutely stressful events and a susceptibility to suicidal behavior (a diathesis). This article presents an overview of studies that demonstrate that stress and dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, as measured by cortisol levels, are important additional risk factors for suicide. Evidence for other putative stress-related suicide risk factors including childhood trauma, impaired executive function, impulsivity and disrupted sleep are considered together with the impact of family history of suicide, perinatal and epigenetic influences on suicide risk.


Language: en

Keywords

Suicide; Impulsivity; Stress; Sleep; Allostatic load; Childhood trauma; Cortisol awakening response; Cortisol reactivity; Early life adversity; Executive function; Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis

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