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Journal Article

Citation

Sanghera P. Paediatr. Nurs. 2007; 19(6): 29-32.

Affiliation

Mayfield School, Birmingham.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2007, Scutari Projects)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

17694891

Abstract

Children with disabilities are among the most vulnerable in our society and are more likely to be abused or neglected than non-disabled children. Health professionals in all settings have an important role in child protection as they are often the first to see the signs of abuse and are in a position to identify risk of abuse. Aside from intentional abuse, there are a number of healthcare practices that can be construed as abuse or neglect. Such practices may have become shrouded under normal clinical routines and continue unchallenged, for example, assuming that disabled children cannot give informed consent or that their privacy and dignity do not have to be maintained as they do not feel embarrassed at having their bodies examined. A health professional or student is guilty of abusive practice if he or she intentionally carries out such practices, allows them to continue by not speaking up or does not learn about the signs and symptoms of abuse in children with disabilities and how to understand their communications. Identifying and stopping both intentional and subtle abusive practices is a complex task requiring changes in attitudes held by many in the health services.


Language: en

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