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Journal Article

Citation

Chesin MS, Keilp JG, Kline A, Stanley B, Myers C, Latorre M, St Hill LM, Miller RB, King AR, Boschulte DR, Rodriguez KM, Callahan M, Sedita M, Interian A. Behav. Res. Ther. 2021; 147: e103988.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2021, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.brat.2021.103988

PMID

34700258

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To test whether Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy to Prevent Suicide (MBCT-S) is associated with improvement in attentional control, an objective marker of suicide attempt.

METHOD: In the context of a randomized clinical trial targeting suicide risk in Veterans, computerized Stroop and emotion Stroop (E-Stroop) tasks were administered 3 times over 6-months follow-up to 135 high suicide risk Veterans. Seventy were randomized to receive MBCT-S in addition to enhanced treatment as usual (eTAU), and 65 were randomized to eTAU only. E-Stroop word types included positively- and negatively-valenced emotion, suicide, and combat-related words. Interference scores and mixed effects linear regression analyses were used.

RESULTS: Veterans receiving MBCT-S showed a more favorable trajectory of attentional control over time, as indicated by performance on two E-Stroop tasks. Combat-stress interference scores improved over time among Veterans in MBCT-S. Interference processing time for negative affective words deteriorated over time among Veterans receiving eTAU only.

CONCLUSIONS: MBCT-S may effectively target attentional control, and in particular reduce processing time during affective interference, in high suicide risk Veterans. Future studies to replicate these findings are warranted.


Language: en

Keywords

Veterans; Attentional control; Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy; Suicide risk

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