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Journal Article

Citation

Scherer M, Sullivan WG, Smith DJ, Phillips LG, Robson MC. J. Trauma 1989; 29(3): 388-390.

Affiliation

Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan.

Copyright

(Copyright © 1989, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins)

DOI

unavailable

PMID

2648018

Abstract

The hospital records of all patients presenting to a large urban trauma center emergency department with facial fractures from 1980 through 1984 were reviewed retrospectively. There were 788 patients in the study group, averaging 1.8 fractures per patient for a total of 1,423 facial fractures. The study population had 638 (80.9%) males and 150 (19.1%) females. Racial mix was 71.6% black, 27.8% white, and 0.6% oriental. The most frequent fracture involved the zygoma (23.6%), followed by the orbital floor (21.4%), maxilla, mandible, and nasal bones. The most frequent etiology was assault with a blunt object or fist (70.1%) followed by motor vehicle accidents (13.5%), falls (9.3%), and gunshot wounds (6.1%). Initial diagnostic procedures included a facial X-ray series in 99.9%, tomograms in 43.1%, and CT studies in 8.1%. Surgical intervention was required in 61.2% of cases. Prosthetic materials were used in 8.5% of the cases. At our institution, personal assault was found to be the primary cause of both midface fractures and mandibular fractures.

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