SAFETYLIT WEEKLY UPDATE

We compile citations and summaries of about 400 new articles every week.
Email Signup | RSS Feed

HELP: Tutorials | FAQ
CONTACT US: Contact info

Search Results

Journal Article

Citation

Ko SM, Ji YG. Appl. Ergon. 2018; 67: 237-245.

Affiliation

Department of Industrial Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-Ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, South Korea. Electronic address: yongguji@yonsei.ac.kr.

Copyright

(Copyright © 2018, Elsevier Publishing)

DOI

10.1016/j.apergo.2017.10.009

PMID

29122195

Abstract

In automated driving, a driver can completely concentrate on non-driving-related tasks (NDRTs). This study investigated the flow experience of a driver who concentrated on NDRTs and tasks that induce mental workload under conditional automation. Participants performed NDRTs under different demand levels: a balanced demand-skill level (fit condition) to induce flow, low-demand level to induce boredom, and high-demand level to induce anxiety. In addition, they performed the additional N-Back task, which artificially induces mental workload. The results showed participants had the longest reaction time when they indicated the highest flow score, and had the longest gaze-on time, road-fixation time, hands-on time, and take-over time under the fit condition. Significant differences were not observed in the driver reaction times in the fit condition and the additional N-Back task, indicating that performing NDRTs that induce a high flow experience could influence driver reaction time similar to performing tasks with a high mental workload.

Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Language: en

Keywords

Automated driving; Eye-tracking; Flow experience; NASA-TLX; Take-over time

NEW SEARCH


All SafetyLit records are available for automatic download to Zotero & Mendeley
Print